The Murders In The Rue Morgue Marginalia/ Booktubeathon #1

The Booktube-a-thon is an annual event hosted by Ariel Bissett that encourages people to read as much as they can in seven days. This is my first year participating but it’s well timed for me. Beren and Luthien is due this week, I was captured by A Spell For Chameleon while in the library, I’ve been wanting to read Murder On The Orient Express… So many books, so little time.

This year the Booktube-a-thon is taking place from July 24th to July 30th. The challenges are:

1 || Read a book with a person on the cover.
2 || Read a hyped book.
3 || Finish a book in one day.
4 || Read about a character that is very different from you.
5 || Finish a book completely outdoors.
6 || Read a book you bought because of the cover.
7 || Read seven books.

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My first book is Edgar Allan Poe’s The Murders In The Rue Morgue:The Dupin Tales.

Challenge(s) applied: Err…The people on the cover are seen at a distance, it’s somewhat hyped in Sherlockian lore, I will probably finish it today, as it’s wonderful and has only 100 pages. Not so wonderful, but easy consumption for readathons. 

My marginalia (written in a notebook, not on library book)

pg. v -vi: Oh, vey. Married (Poe) his cousin when she was 13. Have I read Annabel Lee? It sounds familiar.

pg.3-5 This sounds like Sherlock, but he doesn’t put in this much detail. He hates chess but likes droughts. What is droughts?

pg.6  Here’s where it begins! “Books, indeed, were his sole luxuries, and in Paris these were easily obtained.” Exact same living arrangement as Sherlock and Watson. 

Pg. 8 Sherlock Holmes is a work of plagiarism.

pg.10-11 “Terrific Shrieks”? “Wildest disorder”? What a terrible impersonation of a newspaper.

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pg.12-14 This is a long newspaper article… so gruff voice french, shrill voice disputed… probably exotic or muddled accent.

pg. 19 “In investigations such as we are now pursuing, it should not be so much asked ‘what has occurred,’ such as ‘what has occurred that has not occurred before.'”

pg. 24 They see but do not observe.

Pg.35

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Overall, Sherlock plagiarized Rue Morgue in method and detective-biographer relationship, but the plot, the mystery was unique. I have no desire to type the rest, for this is long enough already. I recommend this to any Sherlockian, for this is obviously Sherlock’s second father.

Science in Books

 I finished  Vicious recently, an X-men inspired novel where the protagonists kill themselves to gain powers. It doesn’t come off as very scientific, but they explained it using scientific knowledge. Adrenaline heightens the body’s senses, and depending on the death, can be elevated to significant levels. Thus, they kill themselves when their adrenaline is high; the adrenaline pushes them through death and back into life. With powers.

 I am currently reading The Hidden Life of Trees, a nonfiction book describing communication and cooperation amongst trees. It is written to be easily understood, and if you like nature, is fascinating. Tree roots orient their tips in the direction of sound at 220 hertz, way below human hearing levels. They also scream at that frequency when dehydrated!

One is a novel, another is nonfiction. Yet I read one after the other because I find the science intriguing. Science fiction often predicts what we will be able to sense and do in the future, just think of cellphones in Star Trek. But do we search for ways to mimic sci-fi, vice versa, or are they interdependent?  I believe that they are interdependent because creation is founded by the creator’s imagination, and the creator’s imagination is moved by what has come before.

What are some sci-fi or nonfiction science you have read recently? I would live to explore this some more.

In other news, I recently went to Redwood National and Yosemite in California. I’m thinking of starting a photo blog of what I saw there. I’m thinking of naming it NatureScreams or TanyaSights. Name Ideas?

Perks Of Being A Wallflower letter

 

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March 21, 2017

Hello, my friends

 I’ve decided to write like this to give you a sense of the flow of Wallflower instead of a regular review. Wallflower is about high school, about all of the clichés of high school, really. And now  it’s been proven that a predictable book of cliches  can be a really, really good book. 

Think of your high school. Not the worst part or the best part, but the parts that happened the most, that would normally fade against the sharper memories. Maybe the music you would listen to through your headphones. Wallflower repeatedly mentions music. 

 Was there a guy or girl that you really liked, maybe even loved, but you never really talked to them like your fantasies could materialize. You just talked to them like they were normal people. That’s sort of how Charlie and Sam are, except they’re best friends. 

Maybe this post is stupid. And that’s ok. I didn’t say much, I just tried to write like Charlie does. Did you read it or see the movie? 

 This is my favorite quote:this-is-my-life

 

Sci-fi Women

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Most, if not all, of the sci-fi and fantasy i’ve read star men. Every Bradburian, Adams, and Scott Card star men. the women, when they’re there, are either romantic partners or relatives. The women dominated genres are dystopian and romance, and most of the dystopians have romance! This is insulting because a) this is not the demographic of real world and b) More men in literature perpetuates more men in literature because writers are so used to men in their genre that an unconscious bias develops, creating more male characters within them. I have written more men in my sci-fi stories than i’ve realized, and I blame the man infested genre to have played a party in it.

Discuss! What sci-fi stories have you read star women? How can we train writers to be more inclusive?